Louie Gohmert.jpg

Congressman Louie Gohmert is pictured in a 2018 file photo.

U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Tyler, is making national headlines after he asked a U.S. Forest Service representative if it’s possible to change the orbit of the moon and Earth to combat climate change.

According to an article in The Hill, Gohmert asked the question to Jennifer Eberlien, associate deputy chief of the National Forest System, during a House Natural Resources Committee hearing on Wednesday.

“I understand from what’s been testified to the Forest Service and the BLM (Bureau of Land Management), you want very much to work on the issue of climate change,” Gohmert said to Eberlien.

Gohmert, who represents a significant part of East Texas, said that an immediate past director of NASA once told him that orbits of the moon and the Earth were changing as well as the Earth’s orbit around the sun.

“Is there anything that the National Forest Service, or BLM can do to change the course of the moon’s orbit or the Earth’s orbit around the sun?” Gohmert asked Eberlien. “Obviously they would have profound effects on our climate.”

Eberlien responded by saying she would have to follow up with Gohmert later about that suggestion.

“Well, if you figure out a way that you in the Forest Service can make that change, I’d like to know,” Gohmert said.

On his Twitter, Gohmert later clarified that BLM stood for Bureau of Land Management.

He also tweeted in part, “We know there has been significant solar flare activity, so is there anything the National Forest Service or BLM can do to change the course of the moon’s orbit or earth’s orbit around the sun? Obviously, that would have profound effects on our climate.”

According to NASA, shifts in the orbits of the Earth and moon have minor impacts on the seasons and are not behind global warming, The Hill article read.

 
 

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I came to the Tyler Morning Telegraph in September 2019. I report on crime, courts, breaking news and various events in Tyler and East Texas.