Trump defends work ethic after private schedules leak

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pushing back against criticisms that a leak of his private schedule suggests he is not working hard.

Trump tweeted that it "should have been reported as a positive, not a negative."

He also suggested that when the term "executive time" appears on his schedule, it means he is "generally working, not relaxing."

The president's work ethic has been a topic of Washington conversation after Axios obtained three months of his private schedules.

They revealed that he spent 60 percent of his time in executive time, a term coined by former chief of staff John Kelly for unstructured time in Trump's day. That time often coincides with when Trump is on Twitter.

Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said the leaker's identity should be known this week.

Suspect charged in fatal shooting of Milwaukee officer

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A man who was charged Sunday with killing a Milwaukee officer during a drug raid on his home told investigators that he didn't realize it was police trying to break down his door, authorities said.

Jordan P. Fricke, 26, is charged with first-degree intentional homicide and other crimes in the fatal shooting of 35-year-old Officer Matthew Rittner, who was part of a tactical unit trying to serve a warrant to search the home for illegal drugs and weapons on Wednesday morning.

According to the criminal complaint, police announced their presence several times and said they had a search warrant, and an officer yelled "police" right before Fricke fired four rounds through a hole in the door that Rittner had made with a battering ram. Rittner died of a gunshot wound to the chest.

Fricke's girlfriend said she saw him shoot at the kitchen door and that she knew police were at the door because she heard them identify themselves, according to the complaint.

A $1 million cash bond was set Sunday for Fricke, who remained in jail. A court commissioner found probable cause to hold Fricke for further proceedings, and a preliminary hearing was set for Thursday.

Undercover spy exposed in New York City was 1 of many

LONDON (AP) — When mysterious operatives lured two cybersecurity researchers to meetings at luxury hotels over the past two months, it was an apparent bid to discredit their research about an Israeli company that makes smartphone hacking technology used by some governments to spy on their citizens.

The Associated Press has now learned of similar undercover efforts targeting at least four other individuals who have raised questions about the use of the Israeli firm's spyware.

The four others targeted by operatives include three lawyers involved in related lawsuits in Israel and Cyprus alleging that the company, the NSO Group, sold its spyware to governments with questionable human rights records.

The fourth is a London-based journalist who has covered the litigation. Two of them — the journalist and a Cyprus-based lawyer — were secretly recorded meeting the undercover operatives; footage of them was broadcast on Israeli television just as the AP was preparing to publish this story.

Recommended for you